Latest News

Overview

Latest Education News

A collection of the most recent education journalism, curated by EWA staff. 

A collection of the most recent education journalism, curated by EWA staff. 

Key Coverage

Deserted in the Desert

Thousands of records examined by the Las Vegas Review-Journal show a yearslong history of abuse and neglect allegations at Northwest Academy, a private boarding school for at-risk youth.

Member Stories

May 3 – May 16
Here's what we're reading by EWA members this week

In the months before the shooting at STEM School Highlands Ranch, some parents raised concerns about bullying and inadequate security, reports Jenny Brundin for Colorado Public Radio.

The two school shootings in as many weeks have prompted officials to discuss the risk of students confronting active shooters, writes Tawnell Hobbs for The Wall Street Journal.

Latest News

A Mock Funeral Aims to Help Students Bury Their Pain

By the time the last student walked past the open casket, hundreds of notes were piled inside, bits of pain the mourners hoped to bury.

The casket was real, but the funeral was symbolic, staged at a west-side Atlanta high school surrounded by poverty. It began with gospel music blasting through the gym. A pastor preached redemption and self-worth. Grieving mothers remembered their teenage sons, whose real funerals were just last year.

Latest News

Mississippi Education: Lawmakers Funnel Millions to Connected Companies

Top lawmakers carve out millions of dollars for handpicked education vendors and pet projects each year, bypassing state bid laws and steering money to companies that know the right people or hire the right lobbyists.

A Clarion Ledger analysis of education appropriations for the last four years uncovered millions of dollars in earmarks for select vendors — most of them represented by three lobbying firms. In at least four cases, key lawmakers received campaign contributions from vendors who received those earmarks.

Latest News

Free Press Reporter David Jesse Named Top Education Reporter in U.S.

Detroit Free Press higher education reporter David Jesse was honored as the top education reporter in the country for 2018 by the Education Writers Association.

Jesse was recognized for his coverage of the Larry Nassar scandal at Michigan State University and work he did with Free Press investigative reporter Matthew Dolan on the University of Michigan’s endowment.

EWA — made up of the nation’s education journalists — presented Jesse with the award at its annual conference earlier this week.

Key Coverage

DeVos Might Not Serve as Ed. Secretary If Trump Re-elected

Betsy DeVos hinted Monday that should President Donald Trump get re-elected in 2020 that she might not serve as education secretary during his second term.

“I’m not sure my husband would be OK with that,” said DeVos of her husband, Dick DeVos, a former Michigan gubernatorial candidate, after hesitating before delivering her response.

Member Stories

April 26 – May 2
Here's what we're reading by EWA members this week

Leaky roofs. Corroded pipes. Faulty fire alarm systems. Detroit’s school buildings are broken, but the district lacks the resources to fix them, reports Jennifer Chambers for The Detroit News.

Continuing the wave of teacher activism that began last year, Oregon educators are poised to walk out of their classrooms next week, writes Natalie Pate for the Statesman Journal in Salem.

Latest News

‘Why Would We Even Try?’ Parents Of Disabled Students Almost Never Win In Fights Against Maryland Districts

It’s rare for the parents of students with disabilities to prevail in legal battles against Maryland school districts. In the past five years, they’ve lost more than 85 percent of the time, state education department documents show, even after investing tens of thousands of dollars and countless hours in pursuit of a better education for their children.

Advocates, families and attorneys say the trend is alarming and discourages people from fighting for the rights kids are guaranteed under federal law.

Latest News

Anger Over Greek Life Reaches Boiling Point at Swarthmore, Where Dozens Are Occupying a Frat House

Nearly 80 students congregated on Monday in the living room of Swarthmore College’s Phi Psi fraternity house. Plastered on one wall was a banner featuring the logo of Natural Light beer.

But the students weren’t there to party. For the past three days, they had been occupying the house as part of an extensive protest against the college’s two fraternities.

Latest News

Atlah Church Is Classified as a Hate Group. It’s Able To Run A School Anyway.

Ten years ago, “Daily Show” correspondent Jason Jones sat down to interview a pastor in the classic style of the program ― the correspondent played straight while talking to someone with ridiculous ideas. The interviewee, James Manning, had plenty.

Manning, the pastor at Atlah World Missionary Church in Harlem, was famous for his fiery attacks on then-President Barack Obama ― someone he called a “long-legged mack daddy” who had been “born trash.” The highlight of the interview was Manning telling Jones he thought Obama was the next Hitler.

Member Stories

April 19 – April 25
Here's what we're reading by EWA members this week

In a three-part series for KNKX, Ashley Gross examines how Washington state’s graduation rates exclude many students who are most at risk of dropping out.

As Colorado considers a bill to encourage more students to take advanced courses, Colorado Public Radio’s Jenny Brundin finds that many students and schools aren’t waiting for official action.

Key Coverage

A Search For Answers, A Search For Blame

Max Eden didn’t even want to read about Parkland. He saw the news on Valentine’s Day, after a dinner date with his girlfriend at a little French place in Washington, D.C., taking an Uber home. There was the gut-punch—“oh shit, another school shooting”—then the queasy afterthought that none of this hits as hard as it used to. He knew what would follow. For a few angry weeks, Democrats would demand gun control and Republicans would call for arming teachers. He decided he’d sit it out this time, ignore the news as much as possible.

Latest News

Silicon Valley Came to Kansas Schools. That Started a Rebellion.

The seed of rebellion was planted in classrooms. It grew in kitchens and living rooms, in conversations between students and their parents.

It culminated when Collin Winter, 14, an eighth grader in McPherson, Kan., joined a classroom walkout in January. In the nearby town of Wellington, high schoolers staged a sit-in. Their parents organized in living rooms, at churches and in the back of machine repair shops. They showed up en masse to school board meetings. In neighborhoods with no political yard signs, homemade signs with dark red slash marks suddenly popped up.

Latest News

Temporary Student Homelessness Continues to Affect UF Students

In the summer of 2018, computer science major Nina Boisse, 21, experienced “student homeless week” firsthand for 20 days  — from July 31 until August 20. During this time, which included summer exam week, she and her roommate slept on couches and floors in three different apartments, staying with friends who were often in the process of moving themselves.

Member Stories

April 12 – April 18
Here's what we're reading by EWA members this week

A new report shows wealthy school districts are increasingly splitting from poorer, more racially diverse ones, reports Emmanuel Felton for The Hechinger Report.

The lack of diversity on one North Texas school district’s board is the subject of a voting rights lawsuit filed this week, reports Eva-Marie Ayala for The Dallas Morning News.

Member Stories

April 5 – April 11
Here's what we're reading by EWA members this week

A series of stories this week from education reporters describe the challenges some places face in attracting and keeping teachers. For USA Today, Erin Richards explains how soaring housing prices are fueling a chronic teacher shortage in Hawaii.

In Colorado, officials are trying a novel strategy to attract teachers to rural communities. Colorado Public Radio’s Jenny Brundin reports on the “rural immersion” program.

Member Stories

Mar. 29 – April 4
Here's what we're reading by EWA members this week

For Education Week, Madeline Will examines how a lack of paid parental leave forces many teachers to return to the classroom before they’re ready.

As the scandal grows concerning the lucrative children’s book deal by Baltimore’s mayor, Liz Bowie and Talia Richman of The Baltimore Sun ask: “Where did all the books go?”

Member Stories

Mar. 22 – Mar. 28
Here's what we're reading by EWA members this week

A Connecticut school district’s decision to hire security guards while laying off mental health professionals has sparked a debate about school safety, reports Brian Zahn for the New Haven Register.

Meanwhile, an Indiana elementary school received national attention after teachers there were shot with plastic pellets as part of an active-shooter drill, reports Arika Herron for the Indianapolis Star.

Member Stories

Mar. 15 – Mar. 21
Here's what we're reading by EWA members this week

For Oregon Public Broadcasting, Rob Manning examines schools’ use of seclusion and restraint for students with disabilities.

As Tennessee considers a private school voucher program, Chalkbeat’s Laura Faith Kebede explores how a history of racism and distrust could affect families’ willingness to participate.

Member Stories

Mar. 8 – Mar. 14
Here's what we're reading by EWA members this week

What happened when a charter school in Tennessee replaced in-school suspensions with something called a reflection room? Chalkbeat’s Caroline Bauman examines one effort to rethink discipline.

For The Chronicle of Higher Education, Michael Vasquez explains how a major chain of for-profit colleges “came crashing down” this month.

Member Stories

Mar. 1 – Mar. 7
Here's what we're reading by EWA members this week

In what some are calling “The Trump Effect,” an increasing number of students are considering H.B.C.U.s and single-sex colleges, reports Alina Tugend of The New York Times.

As New York City seeks to diversify its prestigious high schools, some see an opportunity to challenge affirmative action before the U.S. Supreme Court, writes Mark Keierleber for The 74.

Member Stories

Feb. 22 – Feb. 28
Here's what we're reading by EWA members this week

Chalkbeat’s Christina Veiga reports on how the deteriorating conditions of New York City’s public housing buildings are affecting the child care centers nestled within them.

Despite an injection of nearly $1 billion into Washington’s public school system, a majority of the state’s districts are projecting budget shortfalls, reports Neal Morton and Dahlia Bazzaz for The Seattle Times.

Report

(Report) Nonwhite School Districts Get $23 Billion Less Than White Districts Despite Serving the Same Number of Students

The story of our communities can in many ways be told through the lens of the school districts that serve our children. More than organizations that enable learning, school districts are geographic boundaries that serve as magnifying lenses that allow us to focus on issues of race and wealth. They are both a statement of “what is” and “what could be” in our society.

Member Stories

Feb. 15 – Feb. 21
Here's what we're reading by EWA members this week

As a teachers strike begins in Oakland, principals struggle with decision to cross picket line or not, reports Chalkbeat’s Sharon Noguchi.

For The Denver Post, Elizabeth Hernandez details the dramatic back-and-forth that helped end the city’s teachers strike.

The Houston Chronicle’s Jacob Carpenter explores how a new Texas law is creating tension between state and local school accountability systems.

Member Stories

Feb. 8 – Feb. 14
Here's what we're reading by EWA members this week

In South Florida, the first anniversary of the Parkland shooting led reporters’ coverage this week. WLRN’s Jessica Bakeman reports on a year of activism and grief for one survivor of the shooting.

Florida’s new Republican governor, Ron DeSantis, announced plans to have a grand jury investigate possible wrongdoing by Broward County schools, report Skyler Swisher, Scott Travis and Megan O’Matz for the South Florida Sun Sentinel.

Key Coverage

3 States Tried to Shutter Failing For-Profit Online Charter Schools. A Suspicious Pattern of Allegations, Accusations, and Legal Complaints Quickly Followed
The 74

On their face, the allegations describe public officials being bought — and for a pittance. Drinks in a hotel lobby. Airfare reimbursement for a meeting. A $4,000 “personal payment” appearing just before a mid-level functionary inks a government contract for the consultant offering the so-called perks.

Indeed, the legal complaints filed in South Carolina, Georgia, and Nevada have resulted in a string of juicy headlines. And later, though ostensibly unrelated, in the resignations of two of the state employees named.

Member Stories

Feb. 1 – Feb. 7
Here's what we're reading by EWA members this week

With Denver teachers poised to strike, Chalkbeat’s Melanie Asmar analyzes the role of the district’s pay-for-performance teacher compensation system.

In Pennsylvania, a grand jury released a report detailing favoritism, mismanagement, and poor leadership in a now financially insolvent school district, reports Matt McKinney for the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette.

Member Stories

Jan. 25 – Jan. 31
Here's what we're reading by EWA members this week

For The Hechinger Report, Matt Krupnick examines how a cultural divide between farmers and educators is contributing to a widening skills gap in rural communities.

As fallout from the shooting at Stoneman Douglas High School continues, Florida’s new governor is exploring what action he can take against Broward County school board members, report Susannah Bryan, Scott Travis, and Skyler Swisher of the South Florida Sun Sentinel.

Key Coverage

Only Two Percent Of Teachers Are Black Men, Yet Research Confirms They Matter

 A growing body of recent research asserts that a black man in the classroom is both rare and critically needed in American public schools.

Since 2014, ethnic and racial minorities make up more than half of the student population in U.S. public schools, yet about 80 percent of teachers are white and 77 percent of them are female. People of color make up about 20 percent of teachers; a mere 2 percent are black men.

Member Stories

Jan. 18 – Jan. 24
Here's what we're reading by EWA members this week

In Parkland, Fla., administrators have denied a job to the mother of a victim of the 2018 school shootings. For the South Florida Sun Sentinel, Scott Travis examines the politics behind the move.

Thousands of black children attend schools named after segregationist politicians, writes Education Week’s Andrew Ujifusa.

Key Coverage

From Prison To College: How A Formerly Incarcerated Student Overcame The Odds To Graduate

Like many people coming out of prison, Perry Cline never thought he’d get a college degree.

Cline, a 51-year-old black man and Chicago native, just graduated from college. He has a bachelor’s degree in social work. He also co-founded a non-profit to help those battling addiction, and he recently landed a job as a case manager at a substance abuse treatment facility in Champaign, Illinois.

Key Coverage

North Carolina’s Teacher Diversity Gap

In North Carolina, where minority students make up 52 percent of the traditional public school body, 80 percent of teachers are white. For students of color, especially black and Hispanic boys, that means they may seldom – or never – have a teacher who looks like them during their kindergarten through 12th grade years.

Key Coverage

An Epidemic of Untapped Potential

Over the past year, the Globe has tracked down 93 of the 113 valedictorians who appeared in the paper’s first three “Faces of Excellence” features from 2005 to 2007. We wanted to know, more than a decade later, how the stories of Boston’s best and brightest were turning out.

Key Coverage

When You Give a Teacher a Gun

The question is no longer “should we arm teachers?” Now, it’s “how many armed teachers are already out there?” GQ flew down to Ohio to embed with the men and women behind FASTER Saves Lives, a group that has trained thousands of teachers from all across the country how to shoot to kill.

Key Coverage

Why Illinois Won’t ‘Ban The Box’ On College Applications

Next year, the Common Application used by hundreds of colleges and universities will stop asking potential students about their criminal histories. Despite legislative efforts in Illinois, most campuses in the state continue to ask the question. Nationwide, roughly two-thirds of colleges and universities that completed a 2009 survey reported asking prospective students about their criminal histories.

Key Coverage

Far From Home: Different Stories, With Common Threads

On a bulletin board at Skidmore College in Saratoga Springs, New York, a flier advertised a storytelling event for first-generation students to share their experience in their own words.

The event was part of a larger project headed by Senior Associate Dean of Students Luis Inoa. Inoa spent the summer working with a first-gen Skidmore student to research the best practices in first-gen student support at liberal arts colleges around the country. He discovered that storytelling, in particular, is very powerful.

Key Coverage

District Sends Teachers on Home Visits to Help Get More Students to College

West Virginia unveiled a campaign this year for 60 percent of adults ages 25 to 64 to have earned a degree or certificate by 2030. But in this county of fewer than 19,000 residents, just 38 percent of recent high school graduates sought more education, according to the latest available data from the West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission. That’s well below the statewide rate of 55 percent. And in 2016 just 8 percent of McDowell County residents of working age held an associate degree or higher, compared to 31 percent statewide.

Key Coverage

Far From Home: Demystifying the College Experience

On a sunny Saturday in October, about 500 prospective students and their families gathered on the campus of the University of Texas at El Paso for Orange and Blue Day. They met with representatives from financial aid, admissions, and various academic departments in a festival-like atmosphere spread across campus.

The university uses events like this to make college more inviting for families sending their first-ever student to college.

Key Coverage

Rally Had Minor Impact on Admissions as UVa Addresses Financial Needs and Its Own History

The University of Virginia can seem like a textbook college campus: white columns and porticos, long lawns and statues of Thomas Jefferson and Homer.

In 2017, though, UVa’s Rotunda steps were transformed into a maelstrom as white supremacists carried torches and attacked protesters. For months, the school was roiled by protests and political soul-searching.

Key Coverage

Hitting the ‘60 Percent Goal’ Won’t Just Take Work. It Requires a Transformation.

In order to meet its top educational goal, Idaho will need to reinvent itself. And rethink success.

State leaders want more high school graduates to continue their education — to prepare young adults for a changing labor market, and to help Idaho compete economically. This ambitious aim runs headway into hard realities.

Key Coverage

A Little Finland, a Little Canada, a Lot of Moxie: Why One Indianapolis Teachers College Is Betting It Can Train More Successful Educators After a Radical Reboot

On a recent Friday, Kenith Britt joined a group of Marian University faculty members who were courting a student athlete over lunch. A young African-American man with a GPA of 3.99, the prospective student wanted to study engineering, like his father.

Britt gave his standard pitch for Marian’s brand-new Klipsch Educators College, the Indianapolis program where he is dean. “You can become a teacher, or you can become a teacher,” he joked at the end. “Those are your choices.”